Do You Know The No. 1 Reason Why Piano Lessons For Kids Should Include Music Theory?

Music Theory is an essential component in any program consisting of piano or music lessons for kids, unfortunately however, not all programs include this vital aspect and in this article I tell you how detrimental it can be to the child and what you can do about it.

If you or your child learned music in the past, I’m sure there was a time that you wondered if learning music theory was optional.

 

 

Some teachers insist that kids learning to play the piano or any other instrument for that matter learn music theory. Likewise, there are many teachers out there who simply do not teach their students music theory.

 

 

Similarly, there are scores of parents who don’t want their kids to learn music theory. This is sometimes because it costs extra to teach music theory, and at other times it is because it is seen as useless and in many cases because there is a severe shortage of teachers who can actually help make music theory fun.

 

 

Thus, this all results in kids either hating music theory because it is taught in such a boring manner, or that they simply refuse to learn because they feel that learning music should be fun and not be clouded by something as tedious as learning music theory.

 

 

As a child, I too hated music theory and simply could not understand why I had to learn music theory. However, as I grew up I came to understand the importance of music theory and how it helped me master the instrument and become a better musician.

 

 

There are tons of myths out there about why you should not learn music theory or why it is a waste of time and I’m sure you’ve heard at least a few of them.

  • Learning music theory will inhibit natural learning
  • Learning music theory will be tedious and your child will give up learning music because of it.
  • Learning music theory will limit your child’s ability to play by ear.
  • Learning music theory is boring.
  • If you want to play an instrument for fun, then there is no need to learn music theory.
  • World-class players never learned any music theory they developed their ear and became great at it.

 

 

….and there are many more reasons why most people tell you not to learn music theory.

 

 

But, I’m here to tell you that all of those are myths.

 

 

Natural learning can only be enhanced and speeded up by learning music theory not inhibited.

 

 

If taught properly music theory will make learning to play the piano, or any other instrument much more quicker and enjoyable. What is more, kids would love their music lessons if they are taught music theory in a fun and easy to learn manner.

 

 

Contrary to the myth, learning music theory will not limit your child’s ability to play by ear, but speed it up by teaching your child the technicalities and appealing to your child’s auditory and kinaesthetic learning styles.

 

 

As I stated before, if taught properly by a professional teacher, music theory can be really fun and engaging.

 

 

Finally, the myth that world class players never learned any music theory is absolutely untrue. Yes, it is true that many of them were born with the natural talent, but they had to learn their craft and refine it and music theory played a very important role in all of that and helping them master the instruments. Also remember that unless they learned music theory, they would not have been able to write down their compositions and share it with the world.

 

 

So, as you can see, the myths about music theory are just that, they are myths, and they are not true.

 

 

So does that make it necessary for kids to learn music theory while following piano or any other music lessons?

 

 

It doesn’t make it necessary. No.

 

 

You and your child can still choose not to learn music theory, but I have to be clear here.

 

 

Research does indicate that music theory amongst everything else helps give your child the ability to master the instrument he/she is learning at a faster pace and most importantly it helps your child to learn more than one instrument, with relative ease.

 

 

Now how can you say no to that?

 

 

Isn’t it, your dream like it is every parent’s dream to see their child learn to love and enjoy music, master an instrument and possibly play more than one instrument?

 

 

So, now that you know the number one reason why your child needs to learn music theory, what are you going to do, about it?

 

 

If your child is already learning piano or any other instrument, but not learning music theory, you can join my Music Theory only program and get started today. On the other hand, if you want your child to learn an instrument while learning music theory, then check out my Teach Your Child Piano (1-year Homeschool Curriculum).

Music Education: 5 Things You Absolutely Need To Know About The Importance Of Music Theory In Your Child’s Music Education

There is a common misconception that parents who unschool their kids cannot teach music because it requires to be more regimented than other subjects, which could often be learned through everyday life. Well, I would beg to differ on that.

 

Having worked with tonnes of kids in the past, I have seen that there are many ways in which music can be incorporated without any need for a formal programme and in this article I would like to provide a list of things you can do as an unschooling parent, even if you have no knowledge of music yourself.

 

Keep a variety of musical instruments in the house, this does not mean that you have invest a ton of money rather you can buy second hand or just look out for garage sales where you can get smaller instruments that are in good condition. Maybe a friend is moving out of state or province and would let you have their upright.

 

Let the kids freely play on these instruments, you will find that they will make their own music that sounds right to them and if they are ready, they will ask to learn more at which time you can provide them with more resources that are available online.

 

Listen to music from all different genres whether it is blues, jazz, the classics, pop, rock or more and encourage them to tap the beat.

 

Create different playlists with the music you already have stored on your iPad or iPhone and then have a different themed dance party at home.

 

Have kids hum and tap beats that they hear on the radio at worship or at some other venue.

 

Give them opportunities or dance when doing different routine chores around the house, such as setting the table, taking out the trash, tidying their rooms and so on.

 

Older kids wanting to learn but not wanting to take formal classes could be encouraged to find the necessary resources online, through books from the library and elsewhere, which will be much less regimented and very enjoyable.

 

What different ways have you incorporated music into your unschooling lifestyle? I would really like to hear more.

 

Did you find this helpful, do you have any specific questions about how to incorporate your music in to you unschooling lifestyle or how to support an older child’s love for music, then please feel free to message me and I would glad to help you out.

3 ‘Little Known’ Ways To Teach History Of Music In The Homeschool

There is a common misconception that parents who unschool their kids cannot teach music because it requires to be more regimented than other subjects, which could often be learned through everyday life. Well, I would beg to differ on that.

 

Having worked with tonnes of kids in the past, I have seen that there are many ways in which music can be incorporated without any need for a formal programme and in this article I would like to provide a list of things you can do as an unschooling parent, even if you have no knowledge of music yourself.

 

Keep a variety of musical instruments in the house, this does not mean that you have invest a ton of money rather you can buy second hand or just look out for garage sales where you can get smaller instruments that are in good condition. Maybe a friend is moving out of state or province and would let you have their upright.

 

Let the kids freely play on these instruments, you will find that they will make their own music that sounds right to them and if they are ready, they will ask to learn more at which time you can provide them with more resources that are available online.

 

Listen to music from all different genres whether it is blues, jazz, the classics, pop, rock or more and encourage them to tap the beat.

 

Create different playlists with the music you already have stored on your iPad or iPhone and then have a different themed dance party at home.

 

Have kids hum and tap beats that they hear on the radio at worship or at some other venue.

 

Give them opportunities or dance when doing different routine chores around the house, such as setting the table, taking out the trash, tidying their rooms and so on.

 

Older kids wanting to learn but not wanting to take formal classes could be encouraged to find the necessary resources online, through books from the library and elsewhere, which will be much less regimented and very enjoyable.

 

What different ways have you incorporated music into your unschooling lifestyle? I would really like to hear more.

 

Did you find this helpful, do you have any specific questions about how to incorporate your music in to you unschooling lifestyle or how to support an older child’s love for music, then please feel free to message me and I would glad to help you out.

Does Your Teenager Want To Speak ‘Musical Jargon’? Here’s How You Can Help Him In The Homeschool

There is a common misconception that parents who unschool their kids cannot teach music because it requires to be more regimented than other subjects, which could often be learned through everyday life. Well, I would beg to differ on that.

 

Having worked with tonnes of kids in the past, I have seen that there are many ways in which music can be incorporated without any need for a formal programme and in this article I would like to provide a list of things you can do as an unschooling parent, even if you have no knowledge of music yourself.

 

Keep a variety of musical instruments in the house, this does not mean that you have invest a ton of money rather you can buy second hand or just look out for garage sales where you can get smaller instruments that are in good condition. Maybe a friend is moving out of state or province and would let you have their upright.

 

Let the kids freely play on these instruments, you will find that they will make their own music that sounds right to them and if they are ready, they will ask to learn more at which time you can provide them with more resources that are available online.

 

Listen to music from all different genres whether it is blues, jazz, the classics, pop, rock or more and encourage them to tap the beat.

 

Create different playlists with the music you already have stored on your iPad or iPhone and then have a different themed dance party at home.

 

Have kids hum and tap beats that they hear on the radio at worship or at some other venue.

 

Give them opportunities or dance when doing different routine chores around the house, such as setting the table, taking out the trash, tidying their rooms and so on.

 

Older kids wanting to learn but not wanting to take formal classes could be encouraged to find the necessary resources online, through books from the library and elsewhere, which will be much less regimented and very enjoyable.

 

What different ways have you incorporated music into your unschooling lifestyle? I would really like to hear more.

 

Did you find this helpful, do you have any specific questions about how to incorporate your music in to you unschooling lifestyle or how to support an older child’s love for music, then please feel free to message me and I would glad to help you out.

4 Absolutely ‘Must Know’ Ways To Help Your Budding Composer Excel In The Homeschool

There is a common misconception that parents who unschool their kids cannot teach music because it requires to be more regimented than other subjects, which could often be learned through everyday life. Well, I would beg to differ on that.

 

Having worked with tonnes of kids in the past, I have seen that there are many ways in which music can be incorporated without any need for a formal programme and in this article I would like to provide a list of things you can do as an unschooling parent, even if you have no knowledge of music yourself.

 

Keep a variety of musical instruments in the house, this does not mean that you have invest a ton of money rather you can buy second hand or just look out for garage sales where you can get smaller instruments that are in good condition. Maybe a friend is moving out of state or province and would let you have their upright.

 

Let the kids freely play on these instruments, you will find that they will make their own music that sounds right to them and if they are ready, they will ask to learn more at which time you can provide them with more resources that are available online.

 

Listen to music from all different genres whether it is blues, jazz, the classics, pop, rock or more and encourage them to tap the beat.

 

Create different playlists with the music you already have stored on your iPad or iPhone and then have a different themed dance party at home.

 

Have kids hum and tap beats that they hear on the radio at worship or at some other venue.

 

Give them opportunities or dance when doing different routine chores around the house, such as setting the table, taking out the trash, tidying their rooms and so on.

 

Older kids wanting to learn but not wanting to take formal classes could be encouraged to find the necessary resources online, through books from the library and elsewhere, which will be much less regimented and very enjoyable.

 

What different ways have you incorporated music into your unschooling lifestyle? I would really like to hear more.

 

Did you find this helpful, do you have any specific questions about how to incorporate your music in to you unschooling lifestyle or how to support an older child’s love for music, then please feel free to message me and I would glad to help you out.

3 ‘Ridiculously Easy’ Ways To Develop A Good Sense Of Rhythm In Your Kids

There is a common misconception that parents who unschool their kids cannot teach music because it requires to be more regimented than other subjects, which could often be learned through everyday life. Well, I would beg to differ on that.

 

Having worked with tonnes of kids in the past, I have seen that there are many ways in which music can be incorporated without any need for a formal programme and in this article I would like to provide a list of things you can do as an unschooling parent, even if you have no knowledge of music yourself.

 

Keep a variety of musical instruments in the house, this does not mean that you have invest a ton of money rather you can buy second hand or just look out for garage sales where you can get smaller instruments that are in good condition. Maybe a friend is moving out of state or province and would let you have their upright.

 

Let the kids freely play on these instruments, you will find that they will make their own music that sounds right to them and if they are ready, they will ask to learn more at which time you can provide them with more resources that are available online.

 

Listen to music from all different genres whether it is blues, jazz, the classics, pop, rock or more and encourage them to tap the beat.

 

Create different playlists with the music you already have stored on your iPad or iPhone and then have a different themed dance party at home.

 

Have kids hum and tap beats that they hear on the radio at worship or at some other venue.

 

Give them opportunities or dance when doing different routine chores around the house, such as setting the table, taking out the trash, tidying their rooms and so on.

 

Older kids wanting to learn but not wanting to take formal classes could be encouraged to find the necessary resources online, through books from the library and elsewhere, which will be much less regimented and very enjoyable.

 

What different ways have you incorporated music into your unschooling lifestyle? I would really like to hear more.

 

Did you find this helpful, do you have any specific questions about how to incorporate your music in to you unschooling lifestyle or how to support an older child’s love for music, then please feel free to message me and I would glad to help you out.